Howestreet.com - the source for market opinions

ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR INVESTMENT PROFESSIONAL BEFORE MAKING ANY INVESTMENT DECISION

March 25, 2020 | How the Fed’s $6 Trillion Giveaway Could Backfire Catastrophically

Rick Ackerman

Rick Ackerman is the editor of Rick’s Picks, an online service geared to traders of stocks, options, index futures and commodities. His detailed trading strategies have appeared since the early 1990s in Black Box Forecasts, a newsletter he founded that originally was geared to professional option traders. Barron’s once labeled him an “intrepid trader” in a headline that alluded to his key role in solving a notorious pill-tampering case. He received a $200,000 reward when a conviction resulted, and the story was retold on TV’s FBI: The Untold Story. His professional background includes 12 years as a market maker in the pits of the Pacific Coast Exchange, three as an investigator with renowned San Francisco private eye Hal Lipset, seven as a reporter and newspaper editor, three as a columnist for the Sunday San Francisco Examiner, and two decades as a contributor to publications ranging from Barron’s to The Antiquarian Bookman to Fleet Street Letter and Utne Reader.

 

The U.S. dollar took a massive hit in stride following last week’s announcement of a $6 trillion bailout package. The news caused the greenback as measured by the Dollar Index (DXY) to fall by just a few points from recent highs. The dollar’s seemingly inexplicable strength is a harbinger of the catastrophic debt deflation I’ve been warning about for many years, since it will increase the real burden of debt on all who owe dollars.  It also shows how the dollar can be subject to short-covering pressure capable of pushing its value far above any logical threshold, even when the Fed is practically giving away dollars to the rest of the world.

Let me explain. At present, exceptionally strong demand for dollars is being driven in significant part by liquidity issues originating in Japanese financial markets. Like all central banks, the Bank of Japan has usurped the role of debt markets in order to create a nearly unlimited supply of money to prop up the economy. One way it force-feeds yen into the system is by buying Japanese government bonds held by dealers. Dealers have been reluctant to sell lately, however, because they need the bonds to collateralize short-term borrowing in U.S. repo markets. They are more eager than ever to borrow dollars because the Fed has made them so cheap.

‘Opportunity Moves to Size’

The Fed’s intention in backstopping global markets with an effective $4 trillion credit line, in addition to a $2 trillion consumer stimulus, was to avoid a run on financial markets. Instead, the banksters may be about to discover that they have stimulated infinite demand for U.S. dollars. I once wrote about this in the context of my experience as a floor trader. One might think that if, say, IBM shares were trading in 50,000-share blocks, that a million-share offer from out-of-the-blue would overwhelm bids and depress the stock. In fact the opposite held true: As soon as the huge offer was “advertised” on trading screens around the world, arbitrageurs would figure out ways to make use of it, often by shorting call options or buying puts as hedges. Like piranha, they would nibble at the offer at first, until the smell of blood attracted enough feeders to pick the carcass clean in a frenzy.

Opportunity moves to size, as traders say. Unfortunately, the Fed may soon discover how this applies to dollars now that the banksters have stimulated effectively unlimited demand for them.  [A debt of thanks to ZeroHedge for stimulating my thoughts with this article. RA] 

STAY INFORMED! Receive our Weekly Recap of thought provoking articles, podcasts, and radio delivered to your inbox for FREE! Sign up here for the HoweStreet.com Weekly Recap.

March 25th, 2020

Posted In: Rick's Picks

Post a Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All Comments are moderated before appearing on the site

*
*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.